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1010 Hurley Way, Suite 300
Sacramento, California 95825
(916) 263 - 6000

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Rule No.Rule Title
1843.3Penalties for Medication Violations
Rule Text(a) In reaching a decision on a penalty for a violation of Business and Professions Code section 19581, the Board, the board of stewards, the hearing officer or the administrative law judge shall consider the penalties set forth in subsections (d) and (e) of this Rule and any aggravating and mitigating circumstances. Deviation from these penalties is appropriate where the facts of the particular case warrant such a deviation, for example: there may be mitigating circumstances for which a lesser or no penalty is appropriate, and aggravating factors for which a greater penalty is appropriate. (b) Mitigating circumstances and aggravating factors, which must be considered, include but are not limited to: (1) The past record of the licensee regarding violations of Business and Professions Code section 19581; (2) The potential of the drug(s) to influence a horse's racing performance and the amount of the drug present; (3) The legal availability of the drug and whether the drug was prescribed to the horse by a California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) licensed veterinarian; (4) Whether there is reason to believe the responsible party knew of the administration of the drug or intentionally administered the drug; (5) The steps taken by the trainer to safeguard the horse; (6) The steps taken by an owner to safeguard against subsequent medication violations including, but not limited to, the transfer of the horse(s) to an unaffiliated trainer; (A) “Unaffiliated trainer” means a trainer or an assistant trainer who is not related by blood, marriage or domestic partnership, or who is not or was never employed by the trainer from whose care such horse(s) were transferred. (7) The probability of environmental contamination or inadvertent exposure due to human drug use or other factors; (8) The purse of the race; (9) Whether the drug found to be present in the official test sample was one for which the horse was receiving treatment as determined and documented through the process described in Rule 1842 of this division; (10) Whether there was any suspicious wagering pattern on the race; (11) Whether the licensed trainer was acting under the advice of a CHRB licensed veterinarian. (c) The Board shall consider the classification of a drug substance as referred to in Rule 1843.2 of this division and the California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) Penalty Categories Listing by Classification, (Revised 4/15), which is hereby incorporated by reference, if a determination is made that an official test sample from a horse contained: (1) Any drug substance, medication, metabolites or analogues thereof foreign to the horse, whose use is not expressly authorized in this division, or (2) Any drug substance, medication or chemical authorized by this article in excess of the authorized level or other restrictions as set forth in the article. (d) Penalties for violation of each classification level are as follows: . . . . . . . . . . . .. .[See CHRB website “Publications” section for a complete copy of rule 1843.3 including Category A, B, C and D Penalties chart.] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (e) Violations due to the presence of a drug substance in an official test sample, which CHRB drug classification is categorized as warranting a Category “D” penalty, may result in a written warning to the licensed trainer and owner. (f) If a licensee has received a penalty for a Class A, B or C medication violation, and within a 365 day period has a subsequent lesser violation (e.g. an A violation followed by a B violation), the earlier violation shall count as a “prior violation” for the purposes of determining the penalty for the subsequent lesser violation. (g) If a licensee has received a penalty for a Class B, C or D medication violation, and within a 365 day period has a subsequent greater violation (e.g. a D violation followed by a C violation), the earlier violation shall count as an aggravating factor for the purposes of determining the penalty for the subsequent greater violation. (h) Any drug or its metabolite or analogue thereof found to be present in an official test sample that is not classified in Rule 1843.2 of this division shall be classified as a Class 1 substance and a Category “A” penalty until classified by the Board. (i) The administration of a drug substance to a race horse must be documented by the treating veterinarian through the process described in Rule 1842 of this division. (j) Any licensee found to be responsible for the administration of any drug substance resulting in a positive test may be subject to the same penalties set forth for the licensed trainer and his presence may be required at any and all hearings relative to the case. (1) Any veterinarian found to be involved in the administration of any drug substance resulting in a positive test in Penalty Category “A” shall be referred to the California Veterinary Medical Board (CVMB) for consideration of further disciplinary action. (2) Any veterinarian found to be involved in the administration of any drug substance resulting in a positive test in Penalty Category “B” or “C” may be referred to the CVMB for consideration of further disciplinary action upon the recommendation of the Equine Medical Director, the board of stewards or hearing officers. (k) A licensee who is suspended because of a medication violation is not able to benefit financially during the period of suspension. This includes, but is not limited to, ensuring that horses are not transferred to licensed family members or, for any licensee whose suspension is for more than 30 days, to any other licensee who has been an employee of the suspended licensee within the previous year. (1) A licensee whose license is revoked because of a medication violation is not able to benefit financially following the revocation of his or her license. This includes, but is not limited to, ensuring that horses are not transferred to licensed family members or to any other licensee who has been an employee of the licensee whose license is revoked within the previous year. (l) “Licensed family members” means any person who holds an occupational license issued by the CHRB and who is related to the suspended licensee, or the licensee whose license is revoked, by blood, or by marriage or domestic partnership, or who is related by blood to the spouse or domestic partner of such licensee. (1) Licensed trainers suspended 60 days or more shall be banned from all inclosures under the jurisdiction of the CHRB. In addition, during the period of suspension, such trainer shall forfeit all assigned stall space and shall remove from the inclosures all signage, colors, advertisements, training-related equipment, tack, office equipment, and any other property. (2) A trainer whose license is revoked shall be banned from all inclosures under the jurisdiction of the CHRB. In addition, such trainer shall forfeit all assigned stall space and shall remove from the inclosures all signage, colors, advertisements, training-related equipment, tack, office equipment, and any other property. NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 19440, 19461 and 19580, Business and Professions Code. Reference: Sections 19461, 19580, 19581 and 19582, Business and Professions Code; and Section 11425.50, Government Code. HISTORY: 1. New rule filed 5-23-08; effective 5-23-08. 2. Amendment filed 2-14-12; effective 3-15-12. 3. Amendment filed 6-6-12; effective 7-6-12. 4. Amendment filed 10-17-16; effective 1-1-17.
 

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